Persian Rugs


Silk & metal wrapped thread Kashan

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In the world of antique Persian rugs, Kerman carpets are celebrated as being among the best. Kerman rugs are prized by collectors for many reasons, including a wide range of designs, a broad palette, use of natural dyes and fibers, great tensile strength and abrasion resistance, and expert color combinations. No two Kerman rugs are precisely alike, but these general characteristics typify this enduringly popular style.

Kerman Raver
Contents : 1Designs and motifs of Kerman regio     2Colors    4History    4.1Ravar


Heriz rugs are Persian rugs from the area of Heris, East Azerbaijan in northwest Iran, northeast of Tabriz. 19th century examples of such carpets are often found on sale by major auction houses in United States and Europe. The Antique Serapi Heriz Rug is one of the most sought after rugs particularly in the USA and England for many years.

 



The oversized Bakhtiari carpets represent the endeavors of a group of highly skilled weavers and dyers, and usually took up to six years to complete. As well as the enormous time investment this presented, they also posed distinct artistic challenges, and the level of harmony and balance they achieve in their best antique rugs, not to mention their truly inspiring artistry, is incredible.



In the world of antique Persian rugs, Kerman carpets are celebrated as being among the best. Kerman rugs are prized by collectors for many reasons, including a wide range of designs, a broad palette, use of natural dyes and fibers, great tensile strength and abrasion resistance, and expert color combinations. No two Kerman rugs are precisely alike, but these general characteristics typify this enduringly popular style.

 



Antique Kashan Mohtasham rugs are among the very finest Persian rugs and carpetsAntique Persian Mohtasham Kashan Rugs were woven by women in their villages. They were of unusually high quality, and woven using the Persian knot.

 



A Tabriz rug/carpet is a type in the general category of Azerbaijan carpets / Iranian carpets from the city of Tabriz, the capital city of East Azarbaijan Province in north west of Iran totally populated by Azerbaijanis. It is one of the oldest rug weaving centers and makes a huge diversity of types of carpets.

Kerman   4.2Vase Design

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 A Tabriz rug/carpet is a type in the general category of Persian carpets[1][2][3] from the city of Tabriz, the capital city of East Azarbaijan Province in north west of Iran totally populated by Azerbaijanis. It is one of the oldest rug weaving centers and makes a huge diversity of types of carpets



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To meet the rising demand in the west for Persian rugs, the British-Switzerland company Ziegler & Co. opened its office in Tabriz in 1878 and in Sultanabad in 1883. The first World Oriental Carpet Exhibition of 1891 in Vienna and another one in London in 1892 created a rising demand for Persian rugs in the west.

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The Iranian city of Isfahan (also spelt Esfahan) has long been one of the centres for production of the famous Persian carpet (or rug). Isfahani carpets are known for their high quality. The most famous workshop in Isfahan is Seirafian.

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Persian Rugs and Carpets

Persian Rugs and CarpetsA Persian carpet  is a heavy textile, made for a wide variety of utilitarian and symbolic purpose, produced in Iran and surrounding areas which once belonged to the Persian Empire, for home use, local sale, and export. Carpet weaving is an essential part of Persian culture and art. Within the group of Oriental rugs or Islamic carpets produced by the countries of the so-called “rug belt”, the Persian carpet stands out by the variety and elaborateness of its manifold designs.

Persian carpets and rugs of various types were woven in parallel by nomadic tribes, in village and town workshops, and by royal court manufactories alike. As such, they represent different, simultaneous lines of tradition, and reflect the history of Iranand its various peoples. The carpets woven in the Safavid court manufactories of Isfahan during the sixteenth century are famous for their elaborate colours and artistical design, and are treasured in museums and private collections all over the world today. Their patterns and designs have set an artistic tradition for court manufactories which was kept alive during the entire duration of the Persian Empire up to the last royal dynasty of Iran.

Carpets woven in towns and regional centers like Tabriz, Kerman, Mashhad, Kashan, Isfahan, Nain and Qom are characterized by their specific weaving techniques and use of high-quality materials, colours and patterns. Town manufactories like those of Tabriz have played an important historical role in reviving the tradition of carpet weaving after periods of decline. Rugs woven by the villages and various tribes of Iran are distinguished by their fine wool, bright and elaborate colours, and specific, traditional patterns. Nomadic and small village weavers often produce rugs with bolder and sometimes more coarse designs, which are considered as the most authentic and traditional rugs of Persia, as opposed to the artistic, pre-planned designs of the larger workplaces. Gabbeh rugs are the best-known type of carpet from this line of tradition.

The art and craft of carpet weaving has gone through periods of decline during times of political unrest, or under the influence of commercial demands. It particularly suffered from the introduction of synthetic dyes during the second half of the nineteenth century. Carpet weaving still plays a major part in the economy of modern Iran. Modern production is characterized by the revival of traditional dyeing with natural dyes, the reintroduction of traditional tribal patterns, but also by the invention of modern and innovative designs, woven in the centuries-old technique. Hand-woven Persian carpets and rugs were regarded as objects of high artistic and utilitarian value and prestige from the first time they were mentioned by ancient Greek writers, until today.

Although the term “Persian carpet” most often refers to pile-woven textiles, flat-woven carpets and rugs like Kilim, Soumak, and embroidered tissues like Suzani are part of the rich and manifold tradition of Persian carpet weaving.

In 2010, the “traditional skills of carpet weaving” in Fārs and Kashan were inscribed to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists.